Tuesday, April 11, 2017

TV Tuesday: Kurt Seyit & Sura



Recently I discovered Willow & Thatch, a blog that recommends period films and television series. That discovery alone was worth a blog post, but one of their recommendations particularly caught my fancy -- a Turkish historical romance (with subtitles) about star-crossed lovers during WWI. All the episodes are available on Netflix, so I watched the first one out of curiosity.

And now (five episodes in) I can't stop thinking about it.


I mean, really!

Before you go rushing to Netflix, however, I have to tell you a few things. Kurt Seyit & Sura is a SOAP OPERA, rife with heaving bosoms, extended reaction shots, soft-focus fantasy/dream sequences, and quite a bit of figurative mustache twirling from the baddies. (Petro has a mustache perfect for ACTUAL twirling, but thank goodness he is more subtle than that. I kinda love him.) Also, the heroine is the classic swoony, helpless female from Gothic romance. She has moments where I connect to her, but all too often she is staring dewy-eyed at Seyit or into the camera and I find myself wishing she'd get more of a life.

All that said, I am seriously becoming obsessed. The show is beautiful to look at, it has a lovely focus on family and friendship, the hero is gorgeous and intense (like a Turkish Chris Hemsworth with a little Chris Evans thrown in, maybe?), the history is fascinating, and I just want to devour it all whole. Apparently it's based on a real story. And though it's intensely romantic, it's solidly PG--so despite all the romantic "heaving," you don't have to worry about the kids walking in and getting an eyeful of actual bosom or backside. ;)

Perhaps I should include a synopsis? This one from Wikipedia, though not elegantly translated, will do:
The adventures of two people in love who broke away from their magnificent lives in Russia and were dragged to Istanbul. The journey of Kurt Seyit (Kıvanç Tatlıtuğ), a lieutenant from Crimea, and Şura (Farah Zeynep Abdullah), the beautiful daughter of a noble Russian family, from the days of magnificence to the Carpathian front line, from the riots to revolution, from Alushta to occupied Istanbul, to Pera in the 1920’s, is in a sense the journey of their love.

If you want to know more and/or need more persuading, check out 7 Reasons to Watch Kurt Seyit & Sura, though I recommend skipping down to the actual list in order to avoid spoilers.

And finally, a little more of Seyit the Wolf to entice you:


Floppy-hair Seyit


Soldier Seyit

[Cross-posted at Livejournal]